Summer Reading

Summer Reading

Happy Reading

Superintendent
Jason P. McCandless, Ed.D.

Principal
Matthew W. Bishop

 

English Department Chair Catherine Quinn

School Counseling Director Ann Marie Mutz

Dear Parent/Guardian,
The English teachers at Pittsfield High School are already making plans to welcome your child next year. Each Pittsfield High School student will complete a summer reading assignment. Returning to school in September is much easier for those who have maintained the habit of responsive reading during the summer. Those who read over the summer months continue to develop their vocabulary, better their understanding of language, increase their ability to read more easily and more fluently, and excite their imagination. Students who read as a source of intellectual stimulation and general relaxation are also likely to gain the benefits of being lifelong readers.

This year we are excited to offer your child a choice of high interest books! Below are the titles for each grade level. Each student should read the book for his/her grade and complete annotations following guidelines at the end of this letter. Advanced Placement and Search for Values students have very specific assignments. If you have any questions about the assignment, please contact the English Department chair or the Advanced Placement instructor of your course. Each book can be purchased at Barnes and Noble, online on websites like Amazon.com, or borrowed free of charge from the Berkshire Athenaeum. In some cases, titles may be available at Pittsfield High School have your student check with teachers before the end of the school year. See you in September!

Freshman Reading List
Intensive A and Intensive B (Standard) students will complete ONE
book choice with a response journal. ALL the books are chosen as high interest novels, the (*) indicates great books for reluctant readers!

On the Devil’s Courtby Carl Deuker (*) Far Northby Will Hobbs
Boy 21 by Matthew Quick (*)
The Truth About Foreverby Sarah Dessen The Secret Life of Beesby Sue Monk Kidd Light on Snowby Anita Shreve

Thirteen Reasons Whyby Jay Asher
Be More Chillby Ned Vizzini
The Glass Castleby Jeannette Walls (memoir)
Uglies, Specials, Pretties or Extrasby Scott Westerfeld (*) First Part Lastby Angela Johnson (*)
The Girl on the Trainby Paula Hawkins
Challenger Deep​ ​by Neal Shusterman
The Miseducation of Cameron Postby Emily M. Danforth I Will Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson
True Legend by Mike Lupica

Freshman Nonfiction Reading List:

Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand
They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Groupby Susan Campbell Bartoletti Getting Away with Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case by Chris Crowe

Freshman Honors Reading List:
Must read a total of THREEnovels:​ ​The Secret Life of Beesby Sue Monk Kidd, ONEbook of your choice from the Non­Fiction Listand ONE book of your choice from the Freshman Reading List.

Sophomore Reading List
Intensive B (Standard) requires ONE
book choice with annotations. Intensive A requires TWObook choices and annotations for both.

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweetby Jamie Ford Soldby Patricia McCormick
The Ocean at the End of the Laneby Neil Gaiman Handbook For Boysby Walter Dean Myers
The Good Braider by Terry Farish
The Fifth Waveby Rick Yancey
Strong Insideby Andrew Maraniss
Romeo’s Ex: Rosalind’s Storyby Lisa Fiedler
City of Bonesby Cassandra Clare
The Perks of Being a Wallflowerby Stephen Chbosky Concussionby Jeanne Laskas
In the Time of the Butterfliesby Julia Alvarez
Looking for Alaskaby John Green
Before We Were Freeby Julia Alvarez

Sophomore Honors Reading List
In addition to TWOtitles from the list above, Sophomore Honors students must read​ ​The Perks of Being a Wallflowerby Stephen Chbosky

Junior Reading List
Intensive B (Standard) requires ONE
book choice with annotations. Intensive A requires TWObook choices with annotations.

Slaughterhouse Fiveby Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. Heart of the Seaby Nat Philbrick
The Tipping Pointby Malcolm Gladwell Into the Wildby Jon Krakauer

Night Countryby Stewart O’Nan
The Odd Seaby Frederick Reiken
Rite of Passageby Richard Wright
The Boys in the Boatby Daniel James Brown All the Light We Cannot Seeby Anthony Doerr State of Wonderby Ann Patchett

Everything I Never Told Youby Celeste Ng Wildby Cheryl Strayed
At the Water’s Edgeby Sara Gruen
A Long Way Goneby Ishmael Beah

The Light Between Oceansby M. L. Stedman Will Grayson, Will Graysonby John Green

Junior Honors​ ​­ In addition to TWO titles​ ​from the list above with annotations, students in this course MUST read
A Separate Peaceby John Knowles.Please note that this title is available from PHS but students will have to annotate separately.

Junior Advanced Placement Language and Composition
Complete excerpt journals for ALL THREE books. Please see Mr. Barsanti for guidelines.

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer Outliersby Malcolm Gladwell Transit by Anna Seghers

Senior Reading List
Intensive B (Standard) requires ONE
book choice with annotations. Intensive A requires TWObook choices with annotations. Honors has a specific assignment listed below.

Peace Like a Riverby Leif Enger
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
Gone Boy by Gillian Flynn
Tuesdays With Morrieby Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
Foul Ballby Jim Bouton
Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dreamby H.G. Bissinger What is the Whatby Dave Eggers
Water for Elephantsby Sara Gruen
The Lovely Bonesby Alice Sebold
Almost PerfectBrian Katcher
Freakboy by Kristin Clark
Pink by Lili Wilkinson
She’s Come Undone by Wally Lamb
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenanceby Robert M. Pirsig

Senior “Search for Values” Honors Reading List
Choose ONE
title from the list above and annotate. Then read the following TWOtitles and annotate. Please note that your annotation guidelines are different than below. Please find Ms. O’Hagerty or Mr. Collingsworth for the handout.

Every Dayby David Levithan The Watchmen by Alan Moore

Senior Advanced Placement Literature and Composition

Please see the Google Classroom if you did not receive the assignments for Ms. O’Hagerty’s course. SPECIFIC ANNOTATIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT. FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES AND RUBRIC ON CLASSROOM !I will invite you to a Google Classroom for ALL AP Literature students. The AP Literature assignment is DUE ON THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2. Please bring the books to class. Choose ONEtitle from the list above (you are welcome :) ) then read and annotate the following TWO titles:

Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Closeby Jonathan Safran Foer

PITTSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL Simple Annotation Guidelines Bookmark

Bookmark Guidelines and Rubric

Bookmark Guidelines and Rubric

Annotation is a key component of close reading. Since students will annotate texts all year, they need to develop a system that works for them. Effective annotating is both economical and consistent. The techniques are almost limitless. For summer reading we are asking students to do simple annotations.

Students will complete one annotation for roughly every 20 pages. This involves underlining or marking with a Post­It note the excerpt you are annotating.Briefly note why you chose the excerpt. Excerpts may be chosen because of the book’s themes, symbols, character development, conflict, style, context, or figurative language.

Make brief comments in the margins. Use any white space available – inside cover, random blank pages, etc. If you are working with a library book please use notepaper or Post­It notes and note the page number on the note.

A simple way to mark the text:

C = Character
PP= Significant Plot Point
S = Symbol
T= Represents a theme pattern
PC = Personal Choice (Hey, I like that quote!) BL =Beautiful Language
U = Universal meaning

Sample from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
"
So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (226) BL/T

The most common complaint about annotating is that it slows down your reading. Yes, it does. That’s the point. If annotating as you read annoys you, read a chapter, then go back and annotate. Reading a text a second time is preferable anyway. Approach the works with an open mind. Let them inspire you and stretch your imagination. Bring all of your annotated texts to class the first day.

RUBRIC (PHS copy or library book user will hand in notes ) A= Completely underlined throughout the text with notations. B– Underlined throughout, some notations
C– Underlined but limited, some notations

D– Sparse underlining, no notations 0= No annotations

Annotation is a key component of close reading. Since students will annotate texts all year, they need to develop a system that works for them. Effective annotating is both economical and consistent. The techniques are almost limitless. For summer reading we are asking students to do simple annotations.

Students will complete one annotation for roughly every 20 pages. This involves underlining or marking with a Post­It note the excerpt you are annotating.Briefly note why you chose the excerpt. Excerpts may be chosen because of the book’s themes, symbols, character development, conflict, style, context, or figurative language.

Make brief comments in the margins. Use any white space available – inside cover, random blank pages, etc. If you are working with a library book please use notepaper or Post­It notes and note the page number on the note.

A simple way to mark the text:

C = Character
PP= Significant Plot Point
S = Symbol
T= Represents a theme pattern
PC = Personal Choice (Hey, I like that quote!) BL =Beautiful Language
U = Universal meaning

Sample from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
"
So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (226) BL/T

The most common complaint about annotating is that it slows down your reading. Yes, it does. That’s the point. If annotating as you read annoys you, read a chapter, then go back and annotate. Reading a text a second time is preferable anyway. Approach the works with an open mind. Let them inspire you and stretch your imagination. Bring all of your annotated texts to class the first day.

RUBRIC (PHS copy or library book user will hand in notes ) A – Completely underlined throughout the text with notations. B– Underlined throughout, some notations
C– Underlined but limited,, some notations

D– Sparse underlining, no notations 0= No annotations