Strategies

Strategies for Success

For each unit, I will post ways for parents to support the curriculum at home. I encourage you to try some of these easy ideas that will help your student expand their learning beyond the classroom.

Unit 1

Topics Covered:

Self-Esteem, PHS Expectations, What Makes a Good Rule, Learning Modalities, What Makes a Good Workspace

Suggested Exercises:

  • Ask your student what PHS means, and for some examples from throughout the school.
  • Talk about some of the rules you have at home. Are they Clear? Fair? Reachable?
  • Ask your student about their learning modalities score. Are they an Auditory learner? Visual? Kinesthetic? What type of learner are you? Talk about the ways that you learn best.

Unit 2

Topics Covered:

Time Management, Effective Listening and Communication Skills, Business Etiquette, Keyboarding Skills

Suggested Exercises:

  • Talk to your students about how you manage your time.
  • Show them your work calendar, or your to-do list.
  • If they tell you that they don't have time to complete something, ask them why. What is their plan? Have they prioritized their tasks?
  • If they have a big project coming up, sit with them and help them identify smaller pieces and then prioritize and schedule those smaller chunks.
  • Show your student examples of business communications that you've received. Talk to them about the tone of the letter and the format.
  • Ask your students about the different language and speech patterns that they use with different people. Discuss the ways that your speech patterns change when you speak to different people, like your boss, co-workers, customers/clients, parents, family members, shopworkers, etc.

Unit 3

Topics Covered:

Computer Skills/Word Processing, Managing Stress, Values, Learning About Yourself, Making Decisions, Setting Goals, Planning for Success

Suggested Exercises:

  • Talk to your students about stress.
  • Ask student what kinds of things cause them stress and ask them about their symptoms. How they react to stress is an important indicator of how to treat it.
  • Help your student identify POSITIVE ways to relieve stress. If you are not good at relieving your stress in productive and positive ways, help connect your student to someone that does.
  • Encourage your student to develop a stress-relieving hobby, like yoga, crossword puzzles, coloring, working out, playing sports, hiking, Sudoku, jigsaw puzzles and more. Get them mentally and physically involved in an activity that relieves stress.
  • If you see your student working through stress in negative ways, be sure to talk to them about it and perhaps reach out to the school for support. Drug abuse, alcohol, smoking and more are all examples of ways that students relieve stress in unhealthy ways.
  • While socialization is incredibly important, it must not take precedence over important activities like homework, chores and studying. Don't overburden your student, but help them manage their time and manage their stress. Watch for avoidance activities, like hanging out with friends too much.

Unit 4

Topics Covered:

The Writing Process, Why People Work, Choosing a Career, Success in the Job Search

Suggested Exercises:

  • Encourage your student to use a structured process when they are writing. Begin by Prewriting and focusing your topic and research. Draft to get your ideas on paper, organized into sentences and paragraphs. Revise to go back and make sure that your writing is relevant and on topic. Edit and Proofread so that your writing is polished and professional. ​Publish​ by printing and submitting your work.
  • Discuss why you work, the importance of earning money and the value you get from working. Does work make you feel valued? Does it give you a sense of self-worth? What are other reasons that you go to work?
  • Talk to your students about what career they might enjoy. What are their interests and abilities? What careers might suit them? What things are important to them that might help them decide on a career or a field?
  • Did you have a job in high school? What was your first job? What did your first job teach you? Talk to your students about the important skills you learned in that first job. How did you learn to dress properly for work? Who was the boss that taught you the importance of being on time?
  • How did you find your first job? Were you referred by someone? What was the application process like?
  • If you have a resume, or an old cover letter, show your student.
  • Go through help wanted ads with your students. Help them find jobs that might be good for them, either now or in the future. What would they need to do to get that job?

Unit 5

Topics Covered:

Beginning a new job, Expectations of employers, Earnings and paychecks, Budgeting, Insurance, ID Theft

Suggested Exercises:

  • Talk to your students about how you felt when you started working. What did you do right? What went wrong? What would you change?
  • What kinds of things did your boss expect from you? What skills did you need that you didn't learn in school?
  • How does your family handle money? Do you have a budget? How do you make financial decisions?
  • What kinds of insurance do you have? Why did your family purchase insurance? Have you ever had to use it?